JANE EYRE

Prints & Originals Available

The Evening Star
The Evening Star

In Chapter XIII, Jane shows her portfolio to Mr. Rochester and he is especially interested in this painting, exclaiming, "These eyes in the Evening Star you must have seen in a dream."

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The Hedge Sparrow Elf
The Hedge Sparrow Elf

In Chapter XXI, while visiting Gateshead as an adult, Jane sketches "an elf sitting in a hedge-sparrow’s nest, under a wreath of hawthorn-bloom."

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The Lotus-Wreathed Naiad
The Lotus-Wreathed Naiad

In Chapter XXI, while visiting Gateshead as an adult, Jane sketches "a group of reeds and water-flags, and a naiad’s head, crowned with lotus-flowers, rising out of them."

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The Evening Star
The Evening Star

In Chapter XIII, Jane shows her portfolio to Mr. Rochester and he is especially interested in this painting, exclaiming, "These eyes in the Evening Star you must have seen in a dream."

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Painting Eyre

Charlotte Brontë's beloved novel Jane Eyre is a beautiful exploration of the way art can provide an internal liberation from circumstance. Both Brontë herself and her heroine Jane lead lives stifled by social convention but are able, in “silent revolt,” to subsist on the images and tales born of their imaginations. Jane boldly asserts,“Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do.” It is in her powers of creativity that Jane says she finds the “incident, life, fire, feeling, that I desired and had not in my actual existence.”

This collection of ink and watercolor work inspired by Brontë's novel is a celebration of the internal and external landscapes of female artists. The first of the two triptychs is a selection of the watercolor paintings that Jane creates and describes in the novel. They feature female figures that dwell out-of-doors and are in communion with the natural world; their existences are free and powerful. The second triptych is a set of objects from Jane's everyday life described in the book. They represent the world assigned to Jane from which she manages to draw inspiration.

You Almost Unearthly Thing
You Almost Unearthly Thing

This illustration includes the book titles that Jane loves to read as a child at Gateshead. Each book binding was meticulously researched and are representations of the actual bindings available in England at the time the novel is set. Jane's sketching pencils and the moth that Mr. Rochester observes in the garden the evening he proposes are also featured.

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Jane, Will You Have a Flower?
Jane, Will You Have a Flower?

The exact flowers that Jane describes growing in the gardens of Thornfield lie beside her paintbrushes and the pearl brooch that Miss Temple gifts to her. Also present are the shuttlecocks with which she and Adèle play badminton.

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Then Her Soul Sat on Her Lips
Then Her Soul Sat on Her Lips

This illustration includes the china plate that Jane longs to eat off of as a child at Gateshead and the seed-cake that Miss Temple shares with her and Helen at Lowood. The taper that she carries along the haunted halls of Thornfield is also present.

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You Almost Unearthly Thing
You Almost Unearthly Thing

This illustration includes the book titles that Jane loves to read as a child at Gateshead. Each book binding was meticulously researched and are representations of the actual bindings available in England at the time the novel is set. Jane's sketching pencils and the moth that Mr. Rochester observes in the garden the evening he proposes are also featured.

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